Incident at No Gun Ri


Norman L. Tinkler, Korean War veteran

Six veterans of the 1st Cavalry Division said they personally fired on the refugee throng at the South Korean hamlet of No Gun Ri, and six others said they witnessed the mass killing. More said they knew or heard about it.



George D. Preece, Korean War veteran

After five decades, none gave a complete, detailed account. But ex-GIs agreed on such elements as time and place, and on the preponderance of women, children and old men among the victims.



Bruce Cumings, Historian

The 1st Cavalry went in with little understanding of Korea. Half its sergeants had been transferred to other divisions.



Edward L. Daily, Korean War veteran

Two days earlier, 1st Cavalry Division headquarters issued a more explicit order: "No refugees to cross the front line. Fire everyone trying to cross lines. Use discretion in case of women and children."



Gary Solis, Military law expert

Military experts in the law of war told the AP they had never heard of such blanket "kill" orders in the U.S. military.



George D. Preece, Korean War veteran

Veterans said Capt. Melbourne C. Chandler, after speaking with superior officers by radio, had ordered machine-gunners from his heavy-weapons company to set up near the tunnel mouths and open fire.



Park Hee-sook, South Korean survivor

"I can still hear the moans of women dying in a pool of blood," said Park, then a girl of 16. "Children cried and clung to their dead mothers."



Bruce Cumings, Historian

The villagers say they tried to file a compensation claim with a U.S. claims office in Seoul in 1960, but were told they missed a deadline. Later, they say, Korean police warned one man, survivor Yang Hae-chan, to keep quiet about the 1950 events.



Gary Solis, Military law expert

The laws and customs of war condemn indiscriminate killing of civilians, even if a few enemy soldiers are among a large number of noncombatants killed, military experts note.



Eugene Hesselman, Korean War veteran

Some ex-GIs who were there said No Gun Ri didn't have to happen. The refugees could have been screened up on the road or checked out under the bridge, Kerns and Hesselman said.



Park Sun-yong, South Korean survivor

"I saw an American soldier and begged for mercy. I shouted to him that we were not bad people, not communists. But he shot at us again.



Edward L. Daily, Korean War veteran

Other old GIs clearly knew something and felt a need to talk about it.


Bridge Demolitions


Carroll Kinsman, Korean War veteran

GIs recall the scene on Aug. 3, 1950 as South Korean refugees attempted to cross the bridge at Tuksong-dong.



The Bridge at Tuksong-dong

Soldiers of the 14th Combat Engineers were going about the business of destroying the bridge over the Naktong River.



The Bridge at Waegwan

This second bridge was also destroyed by the U.S. Army on the same day in an effort to deny the enemy access to the bridge, after three U.S. Army divisions retreated to the east bank.


Strafing Incidents

Hong Won-ki, survivor of an alleged U.S. attack

Hong says he survived an air attack that killed both his parents and four relatives. In the alleged Jan. 12, 1951 incident Hong says a U.S. plane attacked a group of refugees heading south on a dirt road near Yong-in.


Jim Becker, former AP war correspondent

Becker describes the scene when he encountered the frozen bodies of Korean civilians along a road south of Seoul as he traveled north with U.S. troops on Jan. 26, 1951.



Hong Won-ki, survivor of an alleged U.S. attack

Hong says the refugees were crossing a small frozen stream that crossed the road when the attack came. Hong and his three sisters were the only people to survive the attack, but one of the sisters died from an injury suffered during the attack, Hong says.


Robert Dewald, former Air Force pilot

Dewald describes a mission over a dry riverbed in which he recalls
seeing people who appeared to be civilians.



Survivors of the alleged attack

Lee Byong-hoon describes how 30 American planes flew over hundreds of refugees huddled along the sandy banks of a stream on Jan. 15, 1951. Choi Heung-sup, a survivor of the same attack, says a bullet went through his ankles.


Jim Becker, former AP war correspondent

Becker says that Chinese soldiers could not have been responsible for the deaths of the Korean civilians that he came across when traveling north with U.S. troops on Jan. 26, 1951.


Robert Dewald,
former Air Force pilot

Dewald says refugee groups were probably strafed during some
missions.


Jim Becker, former AP war correspondent

Becker says Army personnel did not show him any evidence of infiltrators among the group of dead Korean civilians that he came across when traveling north with U.S. troops on Jan. 26, 1951.


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